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Year 5 Curriculum

  • ART

    AUTUMN

    Weaving and textiles:  Exploring weaving with different materials, using natural dyes.

    SPRING

    Space art: Focus on Kandinsky as inspiration and creation of space collage.

    SUMMER

    Portraits: Drawing from observation, exploring tones, lines, shade and perspective. Studying the works of others, inspiring our own styles to create portraits.

  • COMPUTING (ICT)

    AUTUMN

    Key Skills: The children revise key computing skills and internet safety topics, including logging on, password safety, word processing, typing skills and saving and retrieving work.

    Online Learning Platform: The children revise the key features of Google Classroom and how it's used for home learning., revising key computing skills, such as word processing, typing and internet safety.

     

    SPRING

    Word Processing - We will be developing our word processing skills by creating formatted information pages using our learning about the planets from our topic work. Web Design - Using the skills learnt in literacy non-fiction writing, we will be creating web pages about a topic. 

     

    SUMMER

    Collaboration: We will be learning how to work collaboratively with others over the internet, using Google Classroom.

    Video Production: We will be learning how to produce videos using iMovie on iPads.

  • DESIGN TECHNOLOGY (DT)

    AUTUMN

    Automatons:  Exploring, designing and making a simple automaton, using different mechanisms.

    SPRING

    Designers: Explore different types of design and the impact it has had.

     

  • GEOGRAPHY

    Greece

    • Understand geographical similarities and differences through the study of a region in a EU country.
    • I can describe the physical and human features of a wider range of places and I can recognise the ways in which places can be inter-dependant.
    • Use maps, atlases, globes and DIGIMAP to locate countries and describe features studied. Include the location of RUSSIA!
    • Use 8 points of a compass and 6 point grid references, symbols or keys on a map to build their knowledge of the UK and wider world. 

     

    Traffic

    • Describe and understand key aspects of human geography including land use, types of settlement.
    • Use fieldwork to observe, measure, record and present the human and physical features in the local area using a range of methods using a range of methods including sketch maps, plans, graphs and digital technologies.
    • Look at London Road; traffic / shop survey. 
  • HISTORY

    The Viking and Anglo Saxon Struggle for the kingdom of England

    • Realises that ancient means thousands of year ago
    • Use terms such as during and after
    • Understands the differences between the period studied and today
    • Begins to understand different beliefs and attitudes
    • Understands that experiences will differ according to the status of people studied
    • Can give more than two reasons for an event and is beginning to explain them rather than list them
    • Understands that some interpretations might be more accurate and reliable than others
    • Writes simple annotations and speech bubbles and can use simple period specific references.
    • Can extract information from a variety of sources and can make deductions. Can explain why some sources are more useful than others
    • Can begin to use own knowledge in evaluating the accuracy of a source

     

    The History of Space Travel

    Knowledge/understanding of wider world history

    • Use terms such as during and after
    • Understands the differences between the period studied and today
    • Understands that experiences will differ according to the status of people studied
    • Can give more than two reasons for an event and is beginning to explain them rather than list them
    • Understands that some interpretations might be more accurate and reliable than others
    • Writes simple annotations and speech bubbles and can use simple period specific references.
    • Can extract information from a variety of sources and can make deductions. Can explain why some sources are more useful than others.

     

    Ancient Greece Depth Study

    Knowledge/understanding of wider world history

    • Realises that ancient means thousands of year ago
    • Use terms such as during and after
    • Understands the differences between the period studied and today
    • Begins to understand different beliefs and attitudes
    • Understands that experiences will differ according to the status of people studied
    • Can give more than two reasons for an event and is beginning to explain them rather than list them
    • Understands that some interpretations might be more accurate and reliable than others
    • Writes simple annotations and speech bubbles and can use simple period specific references.
    • Can extract information from a variety of sources and can make deductions. Can explain why some sources are more useful than others
    • Can begin to use own knowledge in evaluating the accuracy of a source
  • LITERACY

    AUTUMN

    Letter writing – We will be learning how to write formal letter to our future selves.

    Sentence structure and punctuation – We will be recapping the basic skills of writing and discussing more advanced features.

    Instructions – We will be using the text Beowulf as told by Michael Morpurgo to inspire us to create our own instructions.

    Creative fiction writing – We will be inspired by The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick. 

     

    SPRING

    Non-chronological reports - We use our exciting Earth and space science topic to inspire some nonfiction writing – creating fact pages about planets.

    Narrative poetry – we explore how authors use poetic devices, draw inference about character and their actions and motives.

    Structured poetry - We explore haikus, cinquains and tankas - focusing on syllable structure and rhythm alongside carefully chosen vocabulary to create poetic imagery. 

     

    SUMMER

    Persuasive text - Building on our knowledge from our Geography unit, the children will research one Greek holiday destination in depth and design a website to promote this.

    Fiction - Myths - The children will explore the purpose and stylistic traits of Greek myths, taking inspiration from a famous myth to write in a variety of styles.

  • MATHS

    Calculate and compare the area of squares and rectangles.

    Compare different angles.

    Convert between different units of measure e.g. Km to m.

    Distinguish between regular and irregular polygons.

    Draw a given angle, writing its size in degrees.

    Draw shapes using given dimensions and angles.

    Estimate the area of irregular shapes.

    Identify 3-D shapes, including cuboids from 2-D presentations.

    Identify angles at a point and one whole turn.

    Identify angles at a point on a straight line and 1/2 a turn.

    Identify reflex angles.

    Know angles are measured in degrees and can estimate and measure them.

    Measure & calculate the perimeter of composite rectilinear shapes in cm and m.

    Recognise and estimate volume and capacity.

    Reflect shapes and can understand that the original shape hasn't changed

    Solve problems involving + and - of units of measures with decimal notation.

    Solve problems involving converting between units of time.

    State and use the properties of a rectangle to deduce related facts.

    Translate shapes and understand that the original shape hasn't changed

    Understand & use basic equivalence between metric & imperial units.

    Add mentally, using increasingly large numbers.

    Add numbers with more than 4 digits using written methods.

    Divide numbers up to 4 digits by a 1-digit number using a written method.

    Establish whether a number up to 100 is prime & recall prime numbers up to 19.

    Identify multiples and factors, including finding all factor pairs.

    Know and use the vocab of prime numbers, prime factors and composite (non- prime) numbers.

    Multiply and divide whole numbers and decimals by 10, 100 and 1000.

    Multiply numbers up to 4 digits by a 1 digit number using a written method.

    Multiply numbers up to 4 digits by a 2 digit number using long multiplication.

    Recognise and use square numbers and cube numbers.

    Solve addition multi-step problems, deciding what operations & methods to use & why.

    Solve problems including scaling by simple fractions and simple rates.

    Solve problems using multiplication and division.

    Solve subtraction multi-step problems, deciding what operations & methods to use & why.

    Subtract mentally, using increasingly large numbers.

    Subtract numbers with more than 4 digits using written methods.

    Use rounding to check answers to calculations.

    Add and subtract fractions with the same denominator & related fractions.

    Compare and order fractions whose denominators are all multiples of the same number.

    Count in steps of powers of 10 for any given number up to 1,000,000.

    Know what each digit represents in numbers to 1,000,000.

    Multiply proper fractions and mixed numbers by whole numbers, supported by materials & diagrams.

    Read and write decimal numbers as fractions.

    Read Roman numbers to 1000 (M).

    Read, write, order and compare numbers to at least 1,000,000.

    Read, write, order and compare numbers with up to 3 decimal places.

    Recognise and use 1000ths and relate them to 10ths, 100ths and decimal equivalents.

    Recognise mixed numbers and improper fractions and convert from one form to another.

    Recognise the % symbol and can write percentages as a fraction.

    Recognise years written in Roman numerals.

    Round any number up to 1,000,000 to the nearest 10, 100, 1000, 10,000 & 100,000.

    Round decimals with 2 decimal places to the nearest whole number & to one decimal place.

    Solve number problems and practical problems.

    Solve number problems up to 3 decimal places.

    Use negative numbers in context & can count through 0 with positive and negative numbers.

    Complete information in tables including timetables.

    Present information using ICT.

    Read and interpret information in tables including timetables.

    Solve 'comparison' problems using information in line graphs.

    Solve 'difference' problems using information from line graphs.

    Solve 'sum' problems using info from line graphs.

  • MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES (FRENCH)

    YEAR 5 AUTUMN TERM

    This term in French I will:

    · Learn and use the verb ‘aller’

    · Talk about my town using ‘il y a’ and ‘il n’y a pas’ and give my opinion about it

    · Use the verb préfèrer

    · Learn about modes of transport and say how I travel

    · Learn about the nativity in France

     

    YEAR 5 SPRING TERM

    This term I will learn how to:

    · Talk about where I live and describe my house

    · Design and describe my dream house

    · Use prepositions to describe where things are

     

    YEAR 5 SUMMER TERM

    This term I will learn how to:

    · Talk about clothes, and what I wear

    · Design some outfits and describe/compare them using adjectives and colours

    · Use ‘negative’ constructions such as ne…pas and ne….jamais

    · Revisit the verb ‘aller’ to talk about simple future plans.

    · Stage and take part in a mini-fashion show

     

  • MUSIC

    AUTUMN 

    Exploring Rhythm & Pulse

    • Perform rhythmic patterns confidently and with a strong sense of pulse using African percussion instruments.
    • Confidently maintain an independent part within a group piece / composition.
    • Improvise rhythm patterns to complement group compositions.

    Exploring Rounds

    • Sing and play music in two or more parts.
    • Experiment with various harmonies and clusters of sounds.
    • Compose accompaniments using single notes, drones and melodic ostinato.  

     

    SPRING 

    Exploring Musical Processes

    • Investigate graphic scores.
    • Learn to read, compose & create graphic scores.
    • Improvise a number of short pieces.

    Exploring Song Writing

    • Understand various structures used in song writing.
    • Compose a song based on the theme of Ancient Greece.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of the importance of the relationship between lyrics and melody

     

    SUMMER 

    Exploring Sound Sources

    • Create & extend a sound vocabulary.
    • Use ICT and keyboards to explore sound manipulation.
    • Compose a soundscape based on the theme of space.

    Exploring Notation

    • Recall & notate short melodies using staff notation.
    • Follow a simple score & maintain an independent part within a class performance.
  • PERSONAL, SOCIAL & HEALTH EDUCATION (PSHE)

    Autumn

    Global citizenship: Cultural stereotyping and racism and finding out about the British values of democracy, rule of law, mutual respect, individual liberty and tolerance

    Internet safety: Taught through computing

    New beginnings: Understanding how to learn well together and compromise

    Protective behaviours: Feeling safe and unsafe exploring how to tell and use a support network

    Getting on and falling out: Appreciating friendships and trying not to demand too much

    Say no to bullying: Taught during anti-bullying week

     

    Spring

    Gender and identity: Exploring body image and how it is represented in the media

    Healthy eating: Taught through science, DT and PE

    Going for goals: Knowing the skills of a good learner and identifying areas for development

    Gypsy Roma Traveller education: Exploring stereotyping and celebrating diversity within our community

    Money management: Taught during Finance fortnight

    Good to be me: Feeling good about yourself and strategies to cope when things go wrong

     

    Summer

    Drugs and alcohol education: The dangers and effects of drugs

    Relationships: Coping with embarrassment

    Relationships and sex education: Male and female changes during puberty

    Changes: Feeling insecure and unconfident during changes and strategies to deal with this

  • PHYSICAL EDUCATION (PE) & SPORT

    AUTUMN

    INDOOR

    • Indoor Athletics – Indoor Pentathlon

    OUTDOOR/GAMES

    • Multi-skills activities focussing on development of the fundamental movement skills of agility, balance and coordination.

     

    SPRING

    INDOOR

    • Gymnastics – Floor work & low – high level apparatus

    OUTDOOR/GAMES

    • Invasion style games skill development.
    • Net style games skill development.

     

    SUMMER

    INDOOR

    • Dance skill development – topic based

    OUTDOOR/GAMES

    • Athletics activities skill development.
    • Striking and fielding style games skill development.
  • RELIGIOUS EDUCATION (RE)

    AUTUMN

    Why is Muhammad important to Muslims?

    Children will consider and learn:

    • That Muslims call Muhammad the messenger of God.
    • To recognise the impact on Muhammad.
    • To compare own experience of quiet and reflection with those of religious people like Muhammad.
    • To understand that the Qur’an is fundamental to Muslims because it is the word of God (Allah)
    • To learn about the key beliefs that Muslims hold about Muhammad.
    • To identify the ideas expressed through the stories they study.
    • To compare own experience of role. models and influences on their lives with those of Muhammad.

    The call to prayer (Islam)

    Children will consider and learn:

    • To understand that Muslims stop and respond when they hear this sound.
    • To consider who the chn are obedient to.
    • To learn that a muezzin calls 5 times a day.
    • To use imagination about what they would call.
    • To consider what are the important influences in the children’s lives
    • To understand that Muslims have a strict pattern to their day.
    • To consider own daily pattern.
    • To learn about the very first Call to Prayer (Adhan) and understand the word ‘witness’
    • To make connections with the sounds on tape and the Arabic script.
    • To consider the meaning of prayer.

     

    SPRING

    How do Muslims express their beliefs through practice? (Qur’an and 5 pillars)

    Children will consider and learn:

    • The significance of the Qur’an for Muslims.
    • That the 5 pillars of Islam are the foundation of the Qur’an for Muslims.
    • That Muslims have instructions for worship.
    • To know that Sadah is the 2nd Pillar.
    • That abstinence from food plays a part in religious observance.
    • That Sawn (fasting) is the 4th pillar.
    • To compare the feasting of Eid with the fasting of Ramadan.
    • To consider own feasting celebrations.
    • That Zakah (giving alms) is the 3rd pillar.
    • That religious beliefs have an impact on how people make choices.

    Haj and Angels

    Children will consider and learn:

    • To understand what is meant by ‘pilgrimage’.
    • To consider own journeys and how it would feel to be a pilgrim.
    • To know that Makkah is special for Muslims because it is the city of the prophet Muhammad.
    • To know what happens in Haj.
    • That there are some experiences that cause people to wonder and question.
    • That there are puzzling aspects to life for which people of faith provide religious answers.
    • To understand what is of value and concern to Muslims.

     

    SUMMER

    Where did the Christian Bible come from?

    Children will consider and learn:

    • That the Bible is the bestselling book.
    • To ask and reflect on questions still to be answered about the Bible.
    • That the material of the Bible predates the written text.
    • That the Bible is a collection of writings from many different times.
    • That the Bible contains many different literary genres.
    • To identify some extracts from the Bible.
    • To revise knowledge of Jewish Torah.
    • That the old testament  was written in Hebrew and the new testament in Greek.
    • That people have different views about the truth of the Bible.
    • And reflect on own feelings and learning.

    Rites of Passage (Multi-faith)

    Children will consider and learn:

    • To compare and contrast basic beliefs of 4 main religions.
    • That all religions have special ceremonies at the birth of a child.
    • That different religions have different attitudes to death.
    • That most religions accept that growing up brings special responsibilities.
  • SCIENCE

    AUTUMN: 

    Properties and changes in materials

    Pupils should build a more systematic understanding of materials by exploring and comparing the properties of a broad range of materials, including relating these to what they learnt about magnetism in year 3 and about electricity in year 4.

    • compare and group together everyday materials on the basis of their properties, including their hardness, solubility, transparency, conductivity (electrical and thermal), and response to magnets
    • know that some materials will dissolve in liquid to form a solution, and describe how to recover a substance from a solution
    • use knowledge of solids, liquids and gases to decide how mixtures might be separated, including through filtering, sieving and evaporating
    • give reasons, based on evidence from comparative and fair tests, for the particular uses of everyday materials, including metals, wood and plastic
    • demonstrate that dissolving, mixing and changes of state are reversible changes (including melting)
    • Explain that some changes result in the formation of new materials, and that this kind of change is not usually reversible, including changes associated with burning and the action of acid on bicarbonate of soda and rusting.

    They should find out about how chemists create new materials, for example, Spencer Silver, who invented the glue for sticky notes or Ruth Benerito, who invented wrinkle-free cotton.

    SPRING: 

    Earth and Space

    • describe the movement of the Earth, and other planets, relative to the Sun in the solar system
    • describe the movement of the Moon relative to the Earth
    • describe the Sun, Earth and Moon as approximately spherical bodies
    • use the idea of the Earth’s rotation to explain day and night and the apparent movement of the sun across the sky.

    Pupils should learn that the Sun is a star at the centre of our solar system and that it has eight planets: Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. Pupils could find out about the way that ideas about the solar system have developed, understanding how the geocentric model of the solar system gave way to the heliocentric model by considering the work of scientists such as Ptolemy, Alhazen and Copernicus.

    Forces

    • explain that unsupported objects fall towards the Earth because of the force of gravity acting between the Earth and the falling object
    • identify the effects of air resistance, water resistance and friction, that act between moving surfaces
    • Recognise that some mechanisms, including levers, pulleys and gears, allow a smaller force to have a greater effect.

    Pupils should explore falling objects and raise questions about the effects of air resistance. They should explore the effects of air resistance by observing how different objects such as parachutes and sycamore seeds fall. They should experience forces that make things begin to move, get faster or slow down. Pupils should explore the effects of friction on movement and find out how it slows or stops moving objects, for example, by observing the effects of a brake on a bicycle wheel. Pupils should explore the effects of levers, pulleys and simple machines on movement. Pupils might find out how scientists, for example, Galileo Galilei and Isaac Newton helped to develop the theory of gravitation.

    They might design and make products that use levers, pulleys, gears and/or springs and explore their effects.

     

    SUMMER: 

    LIving things and their habitat part 1

    • describe the life process of reproduction in some plants and animals.

    They could observe life-cycle changes in a variety of living things, for example, plants in the vegetable garden or flower border, and animals in the local environment. They should find out about the work of naturalists and animal behaviourists, for example, David Attenborough and Jane Goodall.They might try to grow new plants from different parts of the parent plant, for example, seeds, stem and root cuttings, tubers, bulbs

    LIving things and their habitat part 2 Animals and humans (revisit puberty as part of PSHE).

    • describe the changes as humans develop to old age.

    Draw a timeline to indicate stages in the growth and development of humans.

    • describe the differences in the life cycles of a mammal, an amphibian, an insect and a bird

    They might observe changes in an animal over a period of time (for example, by hatching and rearing chicks), comparing how different animals reproduce and grow.

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